Skip to main

September 11, 2018

5 Best Practices for Launching a Pilot of Video-Driven Teacher Observation

Talk to any teacher, and most likely they crave genuine responses from experienced colleagues and administrators. It’s one of the best ways to improve. There’s a massive roadblock preventing teachers from receiving consistent, ongoing feedback, though: time. With the many hats that teachers and administrators wear, it’s often impossible for them to develop a collegial observation schedule.

Dr. PJ Caposey, the superintendent of Meridian Community USD 223 in Illinois knows that this is a problem, and is dedicated to solving it. 

With that goal in mind, Dr. Caposey and his team recently started a pilot of video teacher observations using a platform called ENGAGE Feedback from Teaching Channel. The experience his district gained reveals five practical insights for other districts considering a similar solution.

1) Start small: Running a small pilot, as opposed to a building-wide or district-wide initiative, is an essential part of successfully implementing a cutting-edge program like this one. Finding teachers to participate in the pilot, though, may not be easy.

Instructional Coach Deanna Simpson is part of the teacher-evaluation committee at Meridian 223 and has been the leader of the pilot. After Dr. Caposey mentioned that the district had the opportunity to test out a video observation and feedback platform, Simpson and her committee brought the idea back to their individual schools, seeking teachers who were “already very reflective in their practice; they’re not intimidated by a video [camera] being in there.”

She eventually found a group of volunteers. Within the initial group, several teachers were already consistently reflecting on their teaching practice, and they looked forward to integrating video into their reflective practice. Another teacher took the idea even further, using the videos with students by asking them to reflect on their engagement in class.

2) Be clear on the purpose of videos: Caposey was determined to use the pilot to empower teachers and principals. “If principals don’t believe they’re going to add value for the teacher, the process is over before it’s begun,” he said.

Among teachers, Simpson explained, “People wanted to know, ‘What’s the take on this? What’s it really going to be used for?’” After discussions with both teachers and principals, the district decided that for the pilot, teachers’ videos would not be tied to evaluations. Simpson also noted that some teachers were happy to use video for recording classes, realizing it could eventually limit potentially disruptive administrative observations. Simpson and Caposey made sure that teachers knew that their videos would be used to support the growth of their practice.

When deciding who would see the videos, Simpson said, “We don’t even have principals in our pilot, because that way nobody has to question the intent of where this is heading.” Self-reflection, as opposed to formal evaluations, is often the first stage of integrating video observations into a district.

3) Make sure all the tech talks to each other: At Meridian 223, teachers are using a variety of devices, from a single laptop or tablet to multiple devices capturing multiple angles. Teaching Channel allows multiple devices to capture video from the same sign-on simultaneously, and also offers a mobile app for iOS devices, so teachers can capture video with their phones.  

4) Build a support system in advance: To track and address technology and implementation challenges, Simpson and the piloting teachers used a shared spreadsheet to provide each other with ad-hoc support.

5) Get permission from parents: Meridian 223, like many districts, uses a release form that determines if students can be featured in district media. According to Simpson, even though one student in a pilot class was not permitted to be filmed, the teacher was mindful of this situation and found it easy to work around it. Simpson emphasized the importance of teachers respecting a parent’s choice to not have their child on camera.

A few months into their pilot experience, Simpson and Caposey have been impressed by the video-based collaboration among teachers. As Simpson put it, “The feedback among those teachers, although brief, provided insight into our practice and each other—and most importantly, added value to each other in the process.”

  “We have teachers driving their own sense of feedback,” Caposey said. “I can’t create change in anyone, but with video I can create conditions for change.” As he considered the wider purpose of the pilot, he concluded, “Evaluation isn’t to fix teachers, it’s to help them grow. I don’t want principals to spot something and say, ‘Fix this.’ I want them to ask, ‘What happened there? What can we do to grow there?’” 

Share

Search the K12 Hub

More From Teaching Channel

Recommended Courses

Impactful Instructional Coaching: Reflection, Support, Growth

Leadership

#5084

Grade

K-12+

Flex Credit

$189

3 Credits

$475

Leading with Awareness and Accountability

Instructional Strategies

#5630

Grade

PK-12+

Flex Credit

$189

3 Credits

$475

Practical Strategies for High-Impact Leadership

Leadership

#5238

Grade

K-12+

Flex Credit

$189

3 Credits

$475

Want to partner with us?

We’re always looking for new authors! If you’re interested in writing an article, please get in touch with us.

Subscribe to our Newsletter!

Get notified of new content added to K12 Hub.

-
Pay as You Learn with our Course Bundles. Select Bundles on SALE through June 30! Explore Your Options >>
close-image
Last Day of Summer Session Registration. Use DOGDAYS24 and get a 3-Credit Course for $399! Learn More >>
close-image