Skip to main

December 18, 2023

3 Protocols to Mandate for a School Culture that Promotes Feedback

Instructional leadership involves a variety of critical components. One of the greatest components involves the creation of a culture of instructional feedback. Just as our students learn best when there are established relationships grounded in respect, the same can be said with those whom we are trying to lead. A learning culture that is supportive of feedback and dialogue among leaders of schools and classrooms helps to support professional growth and reflection. Three protocols worth requiring in order to support this culture of learning include the following:

  1. Routine Observations and Feedback Meetings
  2. Individualized Professional Learning Opportunities
  3. Professional Learning Community Meetings

1. Routine Observations and Feedback Meetings

As instructional leaders, we tend to work best when building schedules and routines. Critical components of this include scheduling routine observations and feedback meetings. These practices need to be in place in order to observe and assess instructional practices and provide a space for feedback.

After each observation, there should be an opportunity to discuss strengths, areas for improvement, and goals. Providing two-way communication during the feedback meetings allows for questions to be answered, strategies to be discussed, goals to be revisited, and clarifications made. Documentation of these observations and meetings is imperative and helps provide a map of professional growth. Keeping a journal or log of the observational feedback may help one affirm the learning through feedback. Self-reflection in the teaching environment is often one of the highest-impact tools to assist in supporting professional learning.

2. Individualized Professional Learning Opportunities

Using the documented observations and feedback meeting notes, educators can begin to work on developing their individualized professional development plans. Individual plans should be based on the educators self-assessment and administrative feedback with targeted areas of growth identified.

These plans need to be revised and adjusted on a regular basis to help one achieve their professional development goals. Emphasis on progress and growth is critical. Instructional leaders should provide guidance and resources to help support this growth in a variety of formats such as observing colleagues, videos, books, formalized professional learning, or collaboration opportunities with others. Including the journal or log into these resources can help support a deeper and richer learning experience. 

3. Professional Learning Community Meetings

Instructional leaders need to work within their master schedules to create space for Professional Learning Community (PLC) meetings. These meetings provide the opportunity for collegial collaboration and the sharing of ideas. Discussions about best practices surrounding management and instructional strategies within classrooms should be prioritized in these meetings. The meetings need to provide the opportunity for open dialogue and peer feedback. Administration should actively participate in the meetings and share insight to support the development of their staff.

Instructional leaders can ensure successful implementation of these protocols by maintaining them as a priority. Working to foster a culture of open communication and continuous improvement supports the work as a leader of change in education and plays a vital role in enhancing the instructional practices and outcomes of teaching practices to ultimately benefit students.


About the Author

Dr. Bridget Amory holds a Doctoral Degree in Leadership and Innovation as well as a Master of Education in School Leadership and Instruction. With a background in educational leadership roles, Dr. Amory is currently the interim superintendent of Mildford School District and the Director of Student Learning.

Connect with Dr. Amory on social media, @BridgetAmory.

Share

Search the K12 Hub

More From Teaching Channel

8 Reading Fluency Myths

Fluency, which can be defined as reading with accuracy (correctly), automaticity (with appropriate speed), and prosody (with appropriate stress and intonation), is often forgotten when

Celebrating Equity in STEM

Did you know that February 11th is International Day of Women and Girls in Science/STEM? This date was designated by the United Nations to promote “full

Recommended Courses

Developing Your Leadership Story

Leadership

#5248

Grade

PK-12+

Flex Credit

$189

3 Credits

$475

Practical Strategies for High-Impact Leadership

Leadership

#5238

Grade

K-12+

Flex Credit

$189

3 Credits

$475

Leading with Awareness and Accountability

Leadership

#5630

Grade

PK-12+

Flex Credit

$189

3 Credits

$475

Want to partner with us?

We’re always looking for new authors! If you’re interested in writing an article, please get in touch with us.

Subscribe to our Newsletter!

Get notified of new content added to K12 Hub.