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Coding for Success

November 5, 2013 / by Elizabeth Weiland

Mark your calendars! December 9th-15th is Computer Science Education Week (CSEdWeek). As part of the festivities, Computing in the Core and Code.org are organizing Hour of Code, a one-hour introduction to coding.

CSEdWeek is trying to raise the profile of computer science in education and their message to students is simple: better computer skills = better jobs as the world becomes more computer-centric. The U.S. Department of Labor projects that by 2020, there will be 1.4 million jobs in computer science.

Hour of Code is trying to recruit 10 million students across the country to learn about computer programming. No prior coding experience is needed, and there are tutorials set up for a variety of devices, including PCs, tablets, smartphones, and even for those who don't have electronic devices. For classrooms without electronics, students can learn coding skills using pencil and paper.

The program is open to students K-12 and teachers can easily get their classrooms involved with the activities provided by CSEdWeek. Hour of Code also has school resources for after the program ends to continue computer science learning. To sign up and get started, check out this participation kit.

 

 

More Resources to Get Your Students Involved in Coding:

  • Edutopia provides a list of 7 coding apps and websites designed to introduce elementary schoolers to computer programming.
  • 6 Tips To Get Your Kids Excited About Coding offers resources to teach coding, as well as suggestions for how to make it more appealing to students.
  • Code.org has a number of useful links to learn about coding, making robots, creating mobile apps, etc. The links are appropriate for learners of all ages, from elementary school to university level.
  • CodeHS is dedicated to teaching high school students how to code.  Tutors associated with the site can help students in real time.
  • Gigabryte is an interactive platform designed to get elementary school students into computer science.
  • Girls Who Code is a rising nonprofit dedicated to closing the gender gap in computing. GWC is immersing young women in computer science instruction, connecting them with female entrepreneurs and engineers. The organization is expanding its operations to multiple locations throughout the country, and has started a pilot program for teachers as well.

Topics: Technology in the Classroom, STEAM

Elizabeth Weiland

Written by Elizabeth Weiland

Elizabeth Weiland is Teaching Channel’s Advertising and Licensing Account Manager. Follow her on Twitter, @ElizabetWeiland.

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